Warning: Are You Making these Deadly Mistakes with Your Emergency Power Generator?

emergency-power-generatorThe recent storms and power outages got us thinking about emergency power generators again. A lot of people make big mistakes with their generators. Here are some of the most common ones.

You Aren’t Changing the Gas

If you have a gas generator you will need to use a gas stabilizer on the fuel you intend to use there, because gas generators typically sit, unused, for long periods of time. If you don’t stabilize the gas the generator won’t start when you need it to.

However, gas stabilizers will only take you so far. You also need to change out the fuel every six months.

You’re Connecting it Directly to the Circuit Box

While you can hook up a gas generator with extension cords, hooking it directly to the circuit box puts you at risk for a fire, especially if you’re using a heavy duty gas generator of 5000+ watts.

Instead, consider having your electrical contractor install a transfer switch. These switches close off power from the utility company while your generator is in use, making it safer for you family.

The Generator is Too Close To Your House

If you’re not keeping a gas generator 15 feet away from the house or more you could be exposing yourself and your family to deadly carbon monoxide fumes. A generator should always stay outside and at a distance to keep you and your family safe.

As discussed in a previous post, this often means opening a door or a window to accommodate the cords. This isn’t ideal, but it’s better than trapping the carbon monoxide fumes inside of your house.

You Haven’t Investigated the Possibility of a Home Standby Generator

If the thought of wasting 22 gallons of gas every 6 months isn’t appealing to you and you’d rather have something a bit more hassle free, it’s time to consider a home standby generator. These generators won’t require you to run extension cords outside and are powerful enough to handle your AC, too.

These systems tie directly into your home power system and switch on when the power goes out. The transfer is automatic, so you don’t have to be home.

If the latest power outage has convinced you of the need for a transfer switch or a home standby generator, call us. We’ve installed home standby generators in Hillsboro, Cary, Wake Forest and the rest of the Triangle area, and we’ll be happy to help you too.

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